Doris Ryder Napaltjarri

Doris Ryder Napaltjarri

Doris is a Warlpiri speaker who was born at Yuendumu in the Western Desert of Central Australia circa 1970. However, she now lives at Willowra Community some 300km North West of Alice Springs. As a semi traditional Warlpiri woman she has an intimate knowledge of and association with particular dreaming s including Bush Potato (Yarla) and Water (Ngapa). Like most Aboriginal artists from Central Australia, when Doris paints, it is always sitting down cross legged with the canvas flat on the ground. It is in this position that she often sings or hums a ceremonial song whilst applying the minute dots that will eventually reveal a composition depicting an aerial perspective of the land to which she is connected, her `country´ near Yuendumu. The surprisingly rapid application of acrylic paint with a single bamboo skewer is done to the tempo of the song and therefore it is really during the process of painting where Doris is truly expressing her dreaming as opposed to any real attachment to the finished product. In this sense a lot of Aboriginal art is performative as it has been for countless years...
Elizabeth Marks Nakamarra

Elizabeth Marks Nakamarra

Born at Walungurru, Elizabeth is the daughter of Frank Tjupurrula and Mary Napanangka. Born about 1959, Elizabeth Nakamarra Marks lives to the east of Kintore, in the Northern Territory. Her languages are Pintupi, Luritja and, from her mother’s side, Warlpiri. She is a member of Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd., one of the later generation of women artists to join this important, Aboriginal owned and operated cooperative, based in Kintore and Kiwirrkura. Her father died when she was an infant and Elizabeth was raised by her stepfather Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula and uncle Johnny Warangkula Tjupurrula, both esteemed artists of the Papunya Tula art movement. She married the late Mick Namarari Tjapaltjarri, also a key artist of the Papunya Tula movement, with whom she had three children Angelina, Peter and Farren. Elizabeth Marks Nakamarra studied for three years at the Bachelor College in Alice Springs and served as a council member in Kintore for two years where she worked assiduously assisting her community members. Elizabeth began painting in her own right in 1998 after her husband died, painting her father’s (Tjupurrula) stories from the area of Kalipinya, located approximately 400km west of Alice Springs and north of Sandy Blight Junction. 2007 Melbourne Elizabeth Marks Nakamarra: New Beginnings, Vivien Anderson Gallery 2004 Gallery Pizzi, Melbourne 2003 Glen Eira City Gallery, Melbourne 2002-03 Chapel of Chapel Gallery, Melbourne 2001-02 Victorian Artists Society Galleries, Melbourne COLLECTIONS Museums and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory Artbank The Kerry Stokes Collection Mem Aziz Collection The Nahum Collection,...
Ronnie Tjampitjipa

Ronnie Tjampitjipa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa was working as a fencer at Papunya when he saw some of the older men in the community painting their traditional designs on wooden boards and canvas. Tjampitjinpa was fascinated and began to paint in the early 1970s, although his career as an artist really blossomed in the mid 1980s. Tjampitjinpa uses bold geometric forms and repetitive lines in his paintings. The colours are often bright and the general effect is mesmerising. Today, his work is included in major Australian and international collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, the Musee du quai Branly, Paris, and the Seattle Art Museum. Collections: Artbank, Sydney. Art Gallery of New South Wales Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide. Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth. Campbelltown City Art Gallery Donald Kahn collection, Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami. Medibank Private Collection Musee des Arts Africans et Oceaniens, Paris. Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Supreme Court of Northern Territory, Darwin. The Holmes a Court Collection, Perth. AUCTION DETAILS: Title: Two Boys at Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay) 1992 Details: Synthetic polymer paint on linen, bears artist’s name and Papunya Tula artists catalogue number RT920828 on the reverse, 152 x 122 cm Auction Price: $79,812 Auction House: Sotheby’s Australia, Important Aboriginal Art, Melbourne, 24/06/2002, Lot No....
Vale Greeny Purvis Petyarre

Vale Greeny Purvis Petyarre

Greeny, apart from being a very high ranking tribal elder in Utopia, was also the nephew of the late Emily Kngwarreye. His father, Alhalkere Jack, Lindsay Bird’s mother and Emily are all blood brothers and sisters. Greeny was married to Kathleen Kemarre and together they had four daughters. Greeny’s paintings, especially his Yam Seed Dreamings, are highly sought after by collectors and galleries throughout the world.  Very rarely did Greeny digress from the traditional ochre colours and he painted with the use of lines, medium size dots and also very fine dots. On occasion he was known to use very large, splash type dot work during a period of collaborations with Emily Kame Kngwarreye (Greeny being the eldest nephew). The colours Greeny used usually indicated different stages, seasons or time.  e.g. Yam Seed Dreaming – before germinating, after germinating, when bearing fruit and sometimes after it has borne fruit. His paintings appear to reflect his unpretentious personality – quietly unassuming but with that feeling of endurance and respect. Greeny passed away on the 3rd of May 2010 and left behind his wife, Kathleen Purvis, daughters Judy, Maureen, Jedda and Jennifer, his granddaughter Katrina Greeny and many extended family including Lindsay Bird, Gloria Petyarre and Annette Davis, who are all other Utopian artists. Collections Mbantua Gallery Permanent Collection, Alice Springs Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Exhibitions 1995  Dreamings, DACOU Gallery, Adelaide 1995  From Beneath the Earth – Utopian Artists, DACOU Gallery, Adelaide 1997  Utopia: Contemporary Aboriginal Works, Quadrivium Gallery NSW 1998  Dreamings, Spazio Pitti Arte, Florence. 1998  Dreamings, Vlaams-Europeesch Conferentiecentrum Brussels, Belgium 1998  May/August – Moseum Dorestad, Wijk bij...
Vale Shorty Jangala Robertson

Vale Shorty Jangala Robertson

  Shorty Jangala Robertson was born at Jila (Chilla Well), a large soakage and claypan north west of Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community located 290 kms north-west of Alice Springs in the NT of Australia. He lived a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle with his parents, older brother and extended Warlpiri family. They travelled vast distances across desert country, passing through Warlukurlangu, south west of Jila and Ngarlikurlangu, north of Yuendumu, visiting Jangala’s, his skin brothers. His childhood memories consist of stories associated with the Coniston massacre of Aboriginal people. Families were also shot at Wantaparri, close to Jila. Shorty Jangala Robertson had virtually no contact with white fellas during his youth but remembered leaving Jila for Mt Theo ‘to hide’ from being shot. His father died at Mt Theo. He moved with his mother to Mt Doreen Station, and subsequently the new settlement of Yuendumu. During World War II, the army took people from Yuendumu to the other Warlpiri settlement at Lajamanu. Shorty was taken and separated from his mother; however, she came to get him on foot and together they travelled hundreds of miles back to Chilla Well. Drought food and medical supplies forced Shorty and his family back to Yuendumu from time to time. His working life was full of adventure and hard work for different enterprises in the Alice Springs and Yuendumu areas. He finally settled at Yuendumu in 1967 after the Australian Citizen Referendum. It is extraordinary in all his travels and jobs over his whole working life, that he escaped the burgeoning and flourishing Central Desert art movement of the 1970’s and 1980’s. Thus Shorty’s...
Barney Ellaga

Barney Ellaga

Barney Ellaga is a senior custodian and law-man of the Alawa community of Arnhem Land. His work is intimately connected to the Dreamings related to his country, and his paintings are saturated with detail and colour. Born in 1941, Barney Ellaga is a senior custodian and law-man of the Alawa community, which is situated on the upper reaches of the Cox and Arnold rivers, south of the Roper River and west of the Gulf of Carpentaria. His work is intimately connected to the Dreamings related to his country, and for several sacred sites he is the Jungai or policeman, as he puts it, restricting entry and taking on the responsibility for maintenance of the area. Barney’s work has been related to that of Rover Thomas of the Ngukurr community on the Roper River, and there are some similarities in the work, particularly in the scale of the landscapes covered in the paintings. But where Thomas would paint gigantic monolithic forms with a strictly limited ochre palette, Barney’s work is often as saturated with detail as it is with colour. The visual, tactile impact of his paintings is enhanced by an inventive use of brush pressure – stippling, dotting and strong strokes combine with broad areas of flat paint – and details such as the kolarong (digderidoo) or a cave or specific rock will be rendered carefully for narrative effect. Some of the work is said to draw attention to the cave rock art of the Minyerri country, the “chalky and textured lines” created from painting on rough surfaces. Another important theme in his work is the King Brown (snake)...
Ngipi Ward

Ngipi Ward

Ngipi Ward lives in the small and very remote community of Patjarr also known as Karilwara, in the Gibson Desert, WA. She was born not far from Lake Blair or Yunpalara at Yirril – meaning to sharpen a stick – around 1949 where she lived a nomad life of hunting and gathering with her family well into the 1960’s. Her way of life was documented in “People of the Australian Western Desert”, a documentary by anthropologist, Ian Dunlop, produced by the Australian Commonwealth Film Unit. Ngipi ward is a painter of growing renown, she paints for Kayili Art Center and a skilled hunter.   COLLECTIONS Warburton Acrylic Community Collection Araluen Centre Collection Lagerburg-Swift Collection The Marshall Collection Vrooom collection, The Netherlands Rectus Collection, Germany National Gallery of Victoria Griffith University Art Collection, Brisbane QLD Art GAllery The Luczo Collection San Francisco, California...
Yakari Napaltjarri

Yakari Napaltjarri

Yakari was born in the bush near Kiwirrikurra (700kms west of Alice Springs) in WA and is a member of the Pintupi people. She came in with her family in the early 60’s. They lived at Papunya before returning to Kiwirrkurra whne the community was bulit. She is still there with her artist sister Payu West Napaltjarri. Yakari paints mainly women’s ceremonies at the water soak site of Mukula in WA. This is Yakari’s country, deep within the Pintupi sacred lands between Kintore and Jupiter Wells. She is one of Papunya Tula’s most well respected senior women and...
Long Maggie Nakamarra

Long Maggie Nakamarra

Long Maggie Nakamarra White, so named because of her tall and slim stature, was born c. 1930 in Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km north-west of Alice Springs. Maggie grew up there with her family. She was a widow, with one married daughter, who lives in Alice Springs with her husband. She started painting in 1987 at Warlukurlangu Artists, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre in Yuendumu. She painted several dreamings including Lukarrara Jukurrpa (Seed Grass Dreaming), Karnta Jukurrpa (Womens Dreaming), Pamapardu Jukurrpa (Flying Ant Dreaming), Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Dreaming) and Jardiwanpa Jukurrpa (Snake Dreaming). Maggie used to go hunting with the other women from Yuendumu, visiting her country at Mijirlparnta (Mission Creek), and watching AFL games, both live and on...
Nancy Napanangaka Gibson

Nancy Napanangaka Gibson

Nancy Napanangka Gibson was born ‘a long time ago’ beside Lake MacKay, an extensive saline lake on the border of the Northern Territory and Western Australia, some 500 km to the west-northwest of Alice Springs. Brought up in the traditional lifestyle, Nancy went hunting and gathering in the bush with her family and learning about country. In the 1950s, her family were the last to leave the bush to settle in Yuendumu. Now a widow, Nancy lives in Nyirripi, 132 km west of the Lake Mackay site. This small Aboriginal community was once an outstation of Yuendumu. Nancy’s family is ‘a big mob’: she has three sons, two daughters, grandchildren and now great-grandchildren. Nancy started painting in Alice Springs many years ago and says she is self-taught. Since 2006 she has been a painter at Warlukurlangu, located in the Aboriginal community of Yuendumu, some 300 km from Alice Springs. The art centre regularly visits Nyirripi, a further 160 kms from the community, dropping off art materials and collecting finished paintings. The main subject of Nancy’s paintings is Mina Mina Jurkurrpa, Dreamings related to her country west of Nyirripi and near Lake MacKay, and also sometimes other Dreamings related to her Mina Mina: Wurrpadi Jukurrpa (Spear-tree Dreaming) and Wakerlpirri Jukurrpa (Dogwood Tree Dreaming) . On the weekends she still goes...
Graham Gordon Tjupurrula

Graham Gordon Tjupurrula

Graham is following in the footsteps of his grandparents, Tjumpo Tjapanangka (deceased) and Ningie Nanala, who were part of the original group of painters at Warlayirti Artists in Balgo. Graham’s mother, Elizabeth Gordon, also paints and has exhibited her work in major exhibitions nationally and internationally. In 2003, Graham’s art was featured on an Australian postage stamp, cementing his reputation as a respected Papunya Tula artist. Since this time, he has continued to fine-tune his craft. Graham’s style is influenced by his forefathers who favour a very restricted palette and he has developed a strong linear style for his contemporary interpretations of traditional iconography. The Tingari are mythical characters of the Dreaming who travelled great distances, stretching from Pintupi country around Papunya, to the Great Sandy Desert and the Tanami Desert around Balgo Hills. The Tingari adventures and travels reveal the law of the people and depict the creation of many sacred places. Their stores are enshrined in Song Cycles and taught to today’s youth – after initiation – providing the context for their contemporary...
Monica Napaltjarri

Monica Napaltjarri

Monica Napaltjarri is a Pintupi artist born around 1960 in desert country south of Kiwirrkura, 700km to the west of Alice Springs. Monica Napaltjarri’s father was Kirindji Kuku Tjungurrayi (1920 – 1966) and her mother was Wangala Nangala (1944-1963). Monica’s mother died while the family was still in the desert, before they came in to the settlements to join other Pintupi people. After Monica Napaltjarri’s father died, she was brought up by her uncle, Yumpululu Tjungurrayi, who was one of the early Papunya artists. Monica Napaltjarri made her first paintings in 1996 at Kiwirrkura, alongside other women painters at the community. But it was a number of years later that she began to paint consistently. Monica Napaltjarri takes stories associated with Women’s Dreaming from her grandmother’s country around Kiwirrkura as the subject matter for her paintings. These ceremonial Dreaming sites include locations at Patinya and Karilwara. Monica Napaltjarri is sister to Joseph Jurra Tjapaltjarri and is related to other artists at Kiwirrkura community, including Takariya Napaltjarri and Yakari Napaltjarri. Painting stories from traditional sources, Monica Napaltjarri tends to work with conventional colour palettes and iconography. Her paintings use the structures of repeated motifs, which create the sense of the extended Tingari narratives that cross her Pintupi lands. Monica Napaltjarri has two children -Maisie Gibson Napurrula and Johnny Gibson...
Vale Billy Missi

Vale Billy Missi

The late Billy Missi, an internationally acclaimed Torres Strait artist pass away mid life in 2012. The Indigenous Art community had lost a leader and gentlemen. Inspired by his culture, his deep concern for the environment, the sea and islands of the Torres Strait. Missi was committed to mentoring and encouraging new generation of Torres Strait Islander artists. Billy Missi’s  Stone Lithography was revealed in his 5th Solo exhibition in 2009, This collection is Titled, Buai Dagmngu Garpalagi : Along Ancestral Lines. Hear Billy Missi’s last interveiw...
Gwenda Turner

Gwenda Turner

Gwenda Nungurrayi Turner is the daughter of Maureen Hudson Nampitjinpa Hudson. She was born in 1978 at Mt Allen Station (Yuelamu) near Yuendumu to the North West of Alice Springs. Gwenda’s style is reminiscent of her mother Maureen, which is not surprising since Maureen has passed on her stories directly to her daughters Gwenda and Jillian, who have both been painting since their teenage years. Gwenda began painting when she was just 15 years old. In her paintings, Gwenda often depicts the rivers and sand hills of her traditional country; Warlukurlangu (Bushfire Country). She had, as a young child, travelled with her family through this country gathering native bush tucker and bush medicine around the sand hill country (known as jilja-marra-marra). The sand hills of this area are significant as they support a wide variety of flora and fauna. After any amount of decent rainfall, there is an abundance of new growth, e.g. grasses and small shrubs, which encourage the local wildlife to return to these areas in search of food. This in turn enables the people of this land to easily hunt for these...
Janet Long Nakamarra

Janet Long Nakamarra

Janet began painting her dreaming stories in 1989, and in 2003 after a period of ‘women’s law’, Elder Warlpiri women gave her the right to paint stories about their Water Dreaming. Her exhibition with Coo-ee Gallery celebrates her initiation in to this Dreaming with a series beautifully executed, highly individualized, intricate images about water and its ritual and economic importance to Walpiri people. Many layered in meaning, these works are based on tribal rain making ceremonies and embody the story of the Ancestral Dreaming Spirit of the Rain. They refer to his adventures in the Walpri Country during Creation times. As such they are important to tribal knowledge in the location of water and express symbolically the physical manifestations of the coming of rain as hail/ rain and its flow underground. When rain comes to the Tanami Desert it floods rivers, billabongs, lagoons and then soakages. The Warlpiri used to live next to the soak-ages until they dried up. When there was no water on the surface they would dig holes to tap the underground streams. In these startlingly detailed and intricate paintings, long sinuous lines articulate the canvas flowing from one end to another, or from the center to each corner. The artist cleverly evokes topography and the location of water sites, among a network of rivulets, streams, and rivers and their tributaries along its course. What Janet Nakamarra gives us is a symbolic impression of what we would see If we peeled back the dry desert cover – patterns of interconnecting underground rivers as they traverse the...
Maureen Hudson Nampijinpa

Maureen Hudson Nampijinpa

Warlpiri artist Maureen Hudson Nampijinpa draws on a broad collection of traditional stories to create the diverse range of styles and motifs that we see in her paintings. Her images of the Water Dreaming site at Mikantji show the creeks and waterways that the Ancestor Rainmaker created when he unleashed a giant storm. The repeated patterns of waterholes spread across the canvas as though it was a vast tract of land. Maureen Hudson Nampijinpa also paints designs associated with women’s ceremonies, including ochre body paint designs applied to the dancer’s bodies and the ritual sweeping of the Ceremonial grounds. These paintings relate to the Women’s ceremonies around Mt Allan, the artists birth place. Other subjects painted by Maureen Hudson Nampijinpa include Tali or sand-hill designs and images under the title of My Country, depicting the iconic features of the artist’s desert country homelands. Maureen Hudson Nampijinpa is recognized for her subtle skills in creating the desert landscape as it is formed and changed by the elements, capturing the rhythm and vastness of the Central Australian country. Aboriginal art status – Established...
Petra Nampijinpa Marshall

Petra Nampijinpa Marshall

Petra Nampijinpa Marshall, lives in the remote community of Yuendumu N.T. Petra is an emerging artist, her paintings depict the stories handed down to her. Petra is surrounded by family and lives closely connected to her Country, Language and her...
Micheal Nelson Tjakamarra / Jagamarra

Micheal Nelson Tjakamarra / Jagamarra

  Michael Nelson Jagamara (also spelt Jagamarra or Tjakamarra) born C. 1946-49 at Pikilyi (Vaughan Springs) west of Yuendemu, Central Australia. Language: Warlpiri and Luritja He is one of the most widely collected and prominent Aboriginal artists. As a young boy, he was taught sand and body paintings and painting on shields by his grandfather. His country lies at the intersection of several major Dreaming paths and his paintings depict these many sacred sites. Michael is the custodian of many Dreaming stories and believes it is his responsibility to preserve, in paint and print, the stories which can assist the teaching of others about his tradition and culture.   He paints several Dreaming stories on a single work: “I thought to myself – I’ll do different way to them mob instead of copying them. Do my own way”. In 1998 his painting career took a remarkable turn with the production of modernist works belonging to the New Expressions series. One of Central Australia’s Grand Old Masters and highly respected artists   Major Artworks include: 1987,       Sydney Opera House, 27 foot long painting, for foyer; 1988,       designer of Mosaic for forecourt of new Parliament House, Canberra; 1989,       BMW Art Car Project, painted M3 Racing Car  ...
Tarisse King

Tarisse King

Tarisse King was born in Adelaide, South Australia on the 4th September 1986. She is the older sister to fellow artist, Sarrita King and daughter to the late highly regarded artist, William King Jungala (1966 – 2007). Tarisse inherits her Australian Aboriginality from her father who was part of the Gurindji tribe from the Northern Territory. Like her forefathers, Tarisse is an assertive individual who is determined to communicate the inseparable connection she and her ancestors have with the Australian land. In homage to her father, her adaptation of Earth Images defines Australia as if looking from outer space back to land; the viewer is given a heightened feeling of drifting above the earth. Then, in her series, My Country Tarisse composes 40,000 year old Aboriginal iconography of song lines, dots and circles to create a bold and contemporary aesthetic and provides yet another more detailed perspective on the landscape. Finally, Pink Salts, lowers the viewer back down the earth and immerses one in the surreal and luminous pink sunsets over the great salt lakes in the centre of Australia. In all of Tarisse’s artworks, she contemporises the ancient and allows the present day viewer an accessible moment to consider the past. At the age of 25, she is a full time artist. She has been included in over 20 exhibitions, is represented in galleries in every Australian state, included in many high profile Australian and international art collections, been auctioned successfully through Paris’ Art. With so many accolades to her name at such a young age, Tarisse’s potential to build on an already outstanding career is more than...
Sarrita King

Sarrita King

Sarrita King was born in Adelaide, South Australia on the 5th March 1988. She is the younger sister to fellow artist, Tarisse King and daughter to the late highly regarded artist, William King Jungala (1966 – 2007). Sarrita inherits her Australian Aboriginality from her father who was part of the Gurindji tribe from the Northern Territory. The Gurindji tribe came to public attention during the 1960s and 1970s when members employed by the Wave Hill cattle station led a landmark case which became the first successful land rights claim in Australia. It is this same strong sense of self and pride that Sarrita embodies and it fuels her drive to paint her totemic landscape. Sarrita spent most of her youth growing up in Darwin in the Northern Territory. Not far from where her ancestors inhabited, it is here that her connection to her Aboriginality and subsequently the land was able to grow. Her exposure to the imperious weather and extreme landscape has provided the theme for her works of art, since she began painting at age 16. Rolling sand hills, cracking lightning and thunderstorms, torrential rain, fire, desert and tangled bush are all scathing environmental factors that shaped her forefather’s lives and also her own. Depicting these elements in her paintings, Sarrita provides a visual articulation of the earth’s language. Sarrita creates frenetic energy on the canvas with her Lightning series and searing heat with her Fire series. Her aesthetic has a universal appeal and provides an entry point for people to experience the power and uniqueness of the Australian landscape and its harsh climate. On a world scale,...
Anna Price Pitjana / Petyarre / Pitjara

Anna Price Pitjana / Petyarre / Pitjara

Anna Price Petyarre is a significant Utopia artist whose fine skills and innovative painting techniques define her impressive portfolio of paintings and subjects.  Born on the Utopia homelands in 1960 and her language group is eastern Anmatyerre. She lives at Atneltyeye, or Boundary Bore and in Alice Springs. Anna Petyarre has painted since she was child – her mother the late artist Glory Ngale was her first role model. Anna Petyarre is related to famous senior artists Emily Kame Kngwarreye and Kudditji Kngwarreye through her grandfather, who was a brother of Emily and Kudditji’s father. Anna Petyarre is a grandmother with five grandchildren. The main subjects for Anna Petyarre’s art include Bush Yam and Yam Seed Dreaming’s, both of which belong to her grandfather’s and father’s country at Atneltyeye. From her own role as a traditional Aboriginal woman involved in ceremonies, Anna Petyarre also paints Awelye, or ceremonial body paint design, associated with women’s ceremony. Recent works have depicted ancestral country, with fine rows of dots marking out the locations of sandhill and bush country, river flood plains and sometimes waterholes and ceremonial sites. Anna Petyarre is famous for her artistic attention to detail in the complex and interwoven designs that she so carefully structures, aimed at expressing her traditional Anmatyerre culture. AWARDS: 1998 Selected entrant for the 15th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts Award, Darwin Collections: Art Gallery of Western Australia Art Gallery of South Australia Art Gallery of New South Wales Anthropology Art Museum, Perth Art Bank, Sydney Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory National Gallery of Victoria National Gallery of Australia, Canberra...
Ann Snell

Ann Snell

After graduating from National Art School in 2001, furthered her studies in the Scottish Sculpture Workshop. Ann Lived in Madrid, Gran Canaria, Belfast and Edinburgh. Upon returning to Australia Ann then opened her own gallery in Surry Hills in 2003 – 2013, Representing Indigenous Artist’s with regular visits to remote communities to source paintings for her Art Gallery. Visiting the remote Australia left a heavy heart, witnessing the mess left behind our recent colonial history.  Ann’s need to process this led to a series of semi-fictional portraits titled First Family, inspired by the gaping hole left in our First Australians. The portraits are saturated in colour, set in harsh light of the desert or the claustrophobic night. “I seek to translate the consuming, uneasy mood and beauty. It’s what i experience in my gut, as an Anglo-European living well in Australia. Knowing we are the only colonized country in the world not to have a Treaty with our Indigenous people.” The second, series of Art is Sketch Book Series, SBS, in the form of Giclee Prints, created in 2013 with layering drawings, watercolours and photography. These Artworks were created to bring about calming and positive energy. To make your morning coffee more beautiful and a work place more inspiring....
Jason Coulthard – Wakarla

Jason Coulthard – Wakarla

Jason Coulthard is an Adnyamathanha man from Port Augusta, South Australia. Jason was invited to be the Artist in residence for the Australian Museum 2013 Sydney. This is where the Wearable Art brand ‘Wakarla’ was launched. Drawing in meditative detail is core of Jason’s Art. Inspired by Indigenous philosophy, his Art explores this clans language, knowledge which was severed in his generation. The Adnyamathanha language now endangered. Other subjects are the cosmos, the harsh climate, The delicate Adnyamathanha ecosystem. The creatures that inhabit the land and the ones that were drivin to extinction. Couthard Arts breathes new life into an ancient language and offers a ‘Sensitive Lens’ to look at Australia through. Wakarla’s clothing range can be found at www.wakarla.com...